Category Added in a WPeMatico Campaign

The Disney Bedtime Hotline Can Help Parents Get Kids to Sleep

The Disney Bedtime Hotline Can Help Parents Get Kids to Sleep

The Disney Bedtime Hotline promises to lull children to sleep with the voices of their favorite characters, reports USA Today.

Children can choose to hear from Elsa and Anna, Mickey, Woody, Spider-Man, Yoda or Princess Jasmine as the characters share how they have been spent their day and bid children goodnight on the hotline. The best part? The characters tell children to think about going to sleep, too.

Get the full story at www.usatoday.com

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/disneys-bedtime-hotline-parents-kids-sleep/

View the Original Article

Love Naps? Science Says They Can Help Boost Productivity

Love Naps? Science Says They Can Help Boost Productivity

Research says that napping can lead to a brain boost during the day, reports the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

University of California-Riverside psychologist Sara Mednick found way back in 2003 that people do better with a visual learning task after they’ve had a good night’s sleep, and not right after they learn it. Mednick also determined that the same test advantage occurred after a 60-90 minute nap.

“What’s amazing is that in a 90-minute nap, you can get the same [learning] benefits as an eight-hour sleep period,” Mednick told the American Psychological Association. “And actually, the nap is having an additive benefit on top of a good night of sleep.”

A more recent study from University of Michigan doctoral student Jennifer Goldschmied and colleagues showed that people who got a 60-minute nap in the middle of the day helped them cope better with difficult people, an effect scientifically described as a boosted tolerance for frustration.

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/naps-boost-productivity/

View the Original Article

Study: Sleep Deprivation Affects Fat Metabolism

Study: Sleep Deprivation Affects Fat Metabolism

Just a few days of sleep deprivation can make people feel less full after eating and metabolize the fat in food differently, according to a new study in the Journal of Lipid Research.

Sleep disruption has been known to be have harmful effects on metabolism for some time. Orfeu Buxton, a professor at Pennsylvania State University and one of the senior authors of the new study, contributed to past research demonstrating that long-term sleep restriction puts people at a higher risk of obesity and diabetes. However, Buxton says in a statement, that most of those studies have focused on glucose metabolism, which is important for diabetes, while relatively few have assessed digestion and metabolism of lipids from food.

Kelly Ness, now a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington, ran the study when she was a graduate student in Buxton’s lab. After participants spent a week getting plenty of sleep at home, she said, the 15 healthy men in their 20s checked into the sleep lab for the ten-night study. For five of those nights the participants spent no more than five hours in bed each night.

During the study, Ness says, she and other researchers collected data but also spent time, “interacting with the subjects, playing games with them, talking with them—helping to keep them awake and engaged and positive.”

To find out how the uncomfortable schedule affected metabolism, the researchers gave participants a standardized high-fat dinner, a bowl of chili mac, after four nights of sleep restriction.”It was very palatable—none of our subjects had trouble finishing it—but very calorically dense,” says Ness. Most participants felt less satisfied after eating the same rich meal while sleep deprived than when they had eaten it while well-rested.

Then researchers compared blood samples from the study participants. They found that sleep restriction affected the postprandial lipid response, leading to faster clearance of lipids from the blood after a meal. That could predispose people to put on weight. “The lipids weren’t evaporating—they were being stored,” says Buxton.

The simulated workweek ended with a simulated Friday and Saturday night when participants could spend ten hours in bed catching up on missed shuteye. After the first night, they ate one last bowl of chili mac. Although participants’ metabolic processing of fat from food was slightly better after a night of recovery sleep, they didn’t recover to the baseline healthy level.

This study was highly controlled, which makes it an imperfect model for the real world, Ness says. It focused on healthy young people, who are usually at a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, and all of the participants were men. The researchers also wondered whether giving more recovery time would change the magnitude of recovery they observed.

Nonetheless, according to Buxton, the study gives worthwhile insight into how people handle fat digestion. “This study’s importance relies on its translational relevance. A high-fat meal in the evening, at dinnertime—and real food, not something infused into the vein? That’s a typical exposure. That’s very American.”

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/sleep-deprivation-fat-metabolism/

View the Original Article

Research on Daytime Sleepiness Drug for Narcolepsy Patients Will be Presented at World Sleep Meeting

Research on Daytime Sleepiness Drug for Narcolepsy Patients Will be Presented at World Sleep Meeting

Researchers will present clinical data on the efficacy and safety of the medication pitolisant (WAKIX) for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy during the World Sleep 2019 meeting in Vancouver, Canada from Sept. 20-25, according to a press release from the biopharmaceutical company Harmony Biosciences.

In a presentation, results will be presented from a randomized, double-blind study that evaluated the abuse potential of pitolisant compared with the stimulant phentermine HCl (C-IV) and placebo in nondependent recreational stimulant users. In addition, seven scientific posters will be presented, including a new post hoc analysis of pooled data from two randomized, placebo-controlled studies of pitolisant in adults with narcolepsy that evaluated the efficacy of the treatment in patients with a high burden of narcolepsy symptoms.

Pitolisant was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy.

“Harmony looks forward to sharing clinical data for WAKIX at the World Sleep 2019 meeting, which will shed light on its product profile as the first and only approved treatment for patients with narcolepsy that is not scheduled as a controlled substance,” Harmony’s chief medical officer, Jeffrey Dayno, MD, says in a statement.

“These data reflect the breadth of scientific evidence in support of WAKIX, and further demonstrate its uniqueness as a first-in-class molecule with a novel mechanism of action. We look forward to presenting these data to a global audience,” says Dayno.

The abstracts being presented include:

  • Oral Presentation: Evaluation of Abuse Potential of the Narcolepsy Medication Pitolisant (September 25, 4:30-6 pm) J Dayno, C Scart-Grès, P Robert, J-C Schwartz, B Setnik.
  • Poster Presentation: Efficacy of Pitolisant in Patients with High Burden of Narcolepsy Symptoms (September 24, 5:30-7 pm) C Davis, L Krahn, B Vaughn, M Thorpy.
  • Poster Presentation: The Safety and Tolerability of Pitolisant in the Treatment of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and Cataplexy in Adult Patients with Narcolepsy: An Open-Label, Expanded Access Program in the United States (September 24, 5:30-7 pm) E Bauer, C Davis, A Patroneva, J Dayno, M Thorpy. 
  • Poster Presentation: Long-Term Evaluation of Safety and Efficacy of Pitolisant in Narcolepsy: HARMONY 3 Study (September 23, 5:30-7 pm) Y Dauvilliers, I Arnulf, C Scart-Grès, I Lecomte, C Caussé, J Dayno, J-C Schwartz.
  • Poster Presentation: Safety and Tolerability of Pitolisant in the Treatment of Adults with Narcolepsy: Integrated Data from Clinical Studies (September 23, 5:30-7 pm) C Scart-Grès, C Momah, M Roy, K Maski, S Piris, R Bogan.
  • Poster Presentation: Efficacy and Safety of Pitolisant in Patients With Narcolepsy: A Review of Clinical Trials (September 24, 5:30-7 pm) Y Dauvilliers, J-C Schwartz, C Davis, J Dayno.
  • Poster Presentation: Pitolisant in Combination With Other Medications for the Management of Narcolepsy (September 23, 5:30-7 pm) K Doghramji, C Davis, A Patroneva, J-C Schwartz, C Scart-Grès, P Robert, T Duvauchelle, S Wanaski, A Krystal.
  • Poster Presentation: Burden of Narcolepsy: A Survey of Patients and Physicians (September 23, 5:30-7 pm) M Thorpy, J Hopper, A Patroneva.

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/harmony-biosciences-present-on-pitolisant/

View the Original Article

Brain Activity Intensity Drives Need for Sleep

Brain Activity Intensity Drives Need for Sleep

The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we’ve been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new UCL study in zebrafish.

The research, published in Neuron, found a gene that responds to brain activity in order to coordinate the need for sleep. It helps shed new light on how sleep is regulated in the brain.

“There are two systems regulating sleep: the circadian and homeostatic systems. We understand the circadian system pretty well — our built-in 24-hour clock that times our biological rhythms, including sleep cycles, and we know where in the brain this rhythm is generated,” explained lead author Dr Jason Rihel (UCL Cell & Developmental Biology).

Get the full story at sciencedaily.com.

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/brain-activity-intensity-sleep/

View the Original Article

‘I Want a Sleep Divorce’: Why Separate Bedrooms Could Save Your Relationship

‘I Want a Sleep Divorce’: Why Separate Bedrooms Could Save Your Relationship

According to a recent National Sleep Foundation survey, as many as 25% of married couples sleep in separate beds, while 10% admit that they have full-on separate bedrooms.

This trend has given rise to the term “sleep divorce,” with one poll of 2,000 Americans from bedding company Slumber Cloud finding that nearly half of the respondents would prefer to sleep alone rather than with their significant other. And for good reason: About 1 in 5 said their partner was the biggest impediment to snagging enough shut-eye.

But does ditching your partner to sleep elsewhere suggest that your relationship is on the rocks, or could be soon?

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/sleep-divorce/

View the Original Article

Back to School with Restless Legs Syndrome

Back to School with Restless Legs Syndrome

For children and adolescents with restless legs syndrome (RLS), sitting still in a classroom can be difficult. Like adults, kids with RLS tend to seek relief from their discomfort by moving their legs – for example, by fidgeting, stretching or changing position. The Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation’s Blog offers tips for caregivers.

Make an appointment to speak with your child’s teachers, school nurse and school counselor. These individuals can help you create an informal plan or a formalized plan (such as a Section 504 plan or Individualized Education Program) with accommodations that allow your child to manage RLS symptoms while at school and during school activities.

For example, stretching or standing can help during classes; applying ice or heating pads may help when sitting for periods of time. You can also share handouts about RLS with the adults who will be supervising your child.

Remind your child to avoid common RLS triggers, such as caffeine, sugar, nicotine, alcohol, stress and extreme exercise. (Moderate exercise is best.)

Get the full story at rlsfoundation.blogspot.com.

 

 

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/school-restless-legs-syndrome-rls/

View the Original Article

Sleep Apnea Treatment: Zephyr Partners With Medical Billing Service Providers for Dental Sleep Medicine Clinics

Sleep Apnea Treatment: Zephyr Partners With Medical Billing Service Providers for Dental Sleep Medicine Clinics

The manufacturer of MATRx plus, an at-home sleep theragnostic system that predicts therapeutic outcomes with a custom-fitted oral appliance, is partnering with two billing service providers in the US – Cross Over Dental Enterprises (CODE) and Pristine Medical Billing to offer out-of-network dental clinics medical billing services for oral appliances for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

The decision comes after the manufacturer, Zephyr, identified medical insurance reimbursement as a common key consideration in a patient’s decision to move forward with testing and treatment of OSA.

“Many of the doctors using our MATRx plus home sleep study/ diagnostic therapy system have asked about medical billing.  As this is outside of our area of expertise, we’re more than happy to bring in the experts. Our partners and advisors tell us that CODE and Pristine are those experts,” Paul Cataford, chief executive officer at Zephyr, says in a statement.

The MATRx plus system is an FDA-approved tablet-based, cloud-connected medical device. The device is also known as “The Simple Sleep Solution,” a platform which is designed to streamline workflow and eliminate oral appliance rework. The company says that by deploying The Simple Sleep Solution, dental clinics can further build the relationship with their patients, increase referrals and differentiate their practice.

After two nights of home sleep study, physicians can determine if a patient will be successful with oral appliance treatment and eliminate a 30-40% failure rate. The study also informs the dental team how to best configure the oral appliance and aims to eliminate guesswork on mandibular positioning.

According to a statement from the company, The Simple Sleep Solution is now available in over 300 dental clinics across the US.

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/sleep-apnea-osa-zephyr-sleep-reimbursement-oral-appliance/

View the Original Article

Zebrafish Show True Colors As Models for Autism Sleep Studies

Zebrafish Show True Colors As Models for Autism Sleep Studies

Zebrafish show two patterns of neuronal activity as they sleep, and these patterns are analogous to rapid eye movement (REM) — or ‘dream sleep’ — and non-REM sleep in people, reports Spectrum.

The findings suggest the fish could be used as models to study how sleep is altered in autistic people.

Zebrafish are often used in neuroscience research because their nervous systems and genetics are similar to those of people. And young zebrafish have transparent bodies, enabling researchers to see the fish’s neurons.

Zebrafish look like they sleep: They become almost still and are relatively unresponsive to external stimuli. But no one had measured their brains or muscle activity during this state.

Get the full story at spectrumnews.org.

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/zebrafish-models-autism-sleep-studies/

View the Original Article

Poor Sleep in Middle Age Linked to Late-Life Alzheimer’s-Related Brain Changes

Poor Sleep in Middle Age Linked to Late-Life Alzheimer’s-Related Brain Changes

Cognitively healthy adults whose sleep quality declined in middle age were more likely in late life to accumulate Alzheimer’s disease-related proteins in the brain than those whose sleep quality improved or did not change, according to research from the University of California, Berkeley.  The study suggests that sleep assessment could one day be used as a noninvasive, inexpensive predictor of Alzheimer’s risk.

It’s also possible that treating sleep problems during “windows of sensitivity” in middle age might help delay the progression of the disease, according to the study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

The researchers analyzed 101 older adults, enrolled in the Berkeley Aging Cohort Study, for beta-amyloid and tau levels, as shown by positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Accumulation of beta-amyloid and tau proteins are common predictors of Alzheimer’s dementia. The researchers also assessed sleep quality: 31 participants completed an electroencephalogram (EEG) sleep assessment, and 95 completed a questionnaire about previous changes in sleep duration and quality.

In participants who had undergone an EEG, fewer slow brain waves during deep sleep were significantly associated with increased beta-amyloid levels in the cortex, the brain’s information processor. Another sleep activity—the interaction of slow brain waves and brief bursts of activity, called spindle oscillations—was strongly associated with increased tau in the medial temporal lobe, a brain region important for long-term memory, the researchers found.

In addition, shorter sleep duration was associated with Alzheimer’s-related brain changes later in life, the researchers found. Specifically, participants who reported shorter sleep in their 50s or their 70s had significantly more beta-amyloid in later life than those whose sleep did not decline. Similarly, participants who reported shorter sleep in their 60s had significantly more tau in later life compared with those whose sleep increased or stayed the same.

These findings help establish that changes in sleep quality and quantity in middle age are associated with, and sometimes predict, Alzheimer’s-related brain changes. However, it is unclear if sleep impairment causes these brain changes, or vice versa. Further studies in larger groups of people could clarify the timing of changes in sleep quality and accumulation of beta-amyloid and tau in the brain.

————

The content for this post was sourced from http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/alzheimers-sleep/

View the Original Article